Rafael George

The accurate measure of any time management technique is whether it helps you neglect the right things.[¹]

We find more charm in hope than possessions, dreams, or reality. The reality, unlike fantasy, is a realm in which we don’t have limitless control of time and can’t hope to meet our…

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Start with trust

Virtual team leaders should start with trust. Assume that your team members are hard at work.

Avoid micromanaging remote workers’ time; set priorities and ask what they need to meet the goal.

Get to know each other as people. Start meetings with conversations, help build connections and establish rapport. Forge…

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When people see problems, they think, “let me take the lead in solving this issue.” That’s what leadership skills aim to encourage and develop.

Collaborate rather than demand. Set up a framework for collaboration.

Break down the project into milestones & provide estimates on these. Define milestones easy to communicate to stakeholders.

Communicate project status to stakeholders.

Manage and call out risks.

Help the team ship and delegate (both to the team and upwards).

Ensure the quality and reliability of the shipped product.

Following these skills will transform a team where every member has the skills, confidence, and empowerment to take the initiative, make decisions, and lead others.

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Tests will always be incomplete, so they must be backed up with other mechanisms. I see this as a plus because I am a twisted mind.

One of the most dangerous things about a formal requirements specification is when people think that once they’ve written it, they are done communicating.

Communicating what a feature does based on requirements is not enough. More is needed to ensure that everything is shared.

Writing tests as specifications is not about changing the vocabulary but how you write the tests. Add the necessary specification that does not cover more than the need. Add tests to stress all functionality of the feature.

How the tests are written impacts system comprehension. Indirectly both the written and automated specifications become the source of truth of what is implemented in the system.

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The acronym WIP stands for Work In Progress. WIP is the number of task items that a team is currently working on.

It frames the capacity of your team’s workflow at any moment. Work in progress (WIP) limits restrict the most significant number of work items in the workflow’s different stages.

They can be defined per person, work stage/type, or the entire work system.

Having too high WIP limits means your team is working on many tasks, switching contexts all the time, and not meeting deadlines.

Low limits, on the other side, meaning that when a given item is pending on a 3rd party, your members have to wait, i.e., they are idle.

WIP limits are essential for delivering customer value as fast as possible. By applying WIP limits, your team has the opportunity of locating bottlenecks in their working processes before they become blockers.

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Logic and Culture have nothing to do with one another. Culture doesn’t make sense to anyone from outside. Culture is common sense to anyone embedded in it.

To understand and work with a large organization, let go of trying to make sense of it. Observe it and see what’s there. After that, logic might help find ways to work inside or even change it.

Map what is. Then think about moving it toward what you want.

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Rafael George

Rafael George

Learning about software engineering through the lens of everything, one snippet of text at a time.